DIY All-Natural Lip Balm

A few years ago I was battling cold sores and started doing some research. I ran across some claims that color dyes can cause lip irritation. Then I realized that the Vaseline lip balm I had been using had yellow dye in it. That may not have been the source of my issue, but I figured it was worth eliminating.

I really like a thicker lip balm like Vaseline so I set out to try to find a DIY that would make a good replacement.

Young Living essential oils are therapeutic grade so they are safe for use on the skin and many have great healing properties (particularly Lavender which is said to have antiseptic and antifungal properties making it a great oil for lip balm!).

Today I’m sharing my favorite lip balm recipe! The great thing about this recipe is that it can be customized using any essential oil or blends that you prefer.

diy lip balm

The consistency of this balm is a bit more solid than petroleum jelly, but it is still on the “soft” side so I recommend using a jar for storage [rather than the twist tubes – I’ve got another recipe for those so keep reading!].

Speaking of jar, I recycled a Mary Kay loose powder container for my balm. Once it was empty it was easy to pop the sifter out. I cleaned the container by soaking it in hot, soapy water with a few drops of Lemon essential oil (it helps with removing stickers and other gooey residue from contains) for about a half hour and then scrubbed it really good.

The recipe below makes enough to fill the MK jar. While I realize not all of you will have an empty powder jar to use, here are some alternative ideas for containers:

  • You may have a little empty space (you could try doubling the recipe), but you could also use a 4 ounce jelly jar (like these)
  • An Altoids tin (don’t have one? Ask your friends. I did that once on Facebook and several people shared their empty tins with me)
  • Several of these cute little sample jars (just ordered some & they’re great, but teeny tiny!)
  • Small baby food jars
  • Or really any small [clean] jar with a lid

If you are planning to use a Citrus essential oil (like Lemon, Orange, Grapefruit, etc.), I recommend avoiding plastic containers because the citrus oils can breakdown some types of plastic over time.

Rather than using a fancy double-boiler and making it forever slimy from the oils, dig through your cabinet for an unloved, empty mason jar (or recycle a marinara / salsa jar – just clean it really good using the same method I used to clean the powder jar above and/or run it through the dishwasher). It’s tough to get the jar clean once you’ve melted the oil in it so it’s best to reserve it for your oily projects.

To create the double boiler, put some water in a pot (no more than half full) then place the mason jar upright (lid removed) into the pot. You’ll add the ingredients into the mason jar while the water in the pot boils around it which will melt the ingredients. You will want the ingredients in the mason jar to be below the water line so it will melt your ingredients evenly.

I don’t bother stirring the oil as it melts because it will just dry onto whatever you’re using to stir and make a mess [warning: don’t ruin your silverware]. You can pick up the jar (use oven mitts!) and gently swirl it a few times during the process if you’d like, but it’s certainly not required.

You will want to wait to add the essential oils after you remove your double boiler from heat.

You may also want to wear an oven mitt when pouring the mixture into the tubes or jars. During the heating process, the glass mason jar can get quite hot and we want to avoid DIY-induced-injuries! If your oven mitt doesn’t have grips, the jar could slip out of your hand so be careful.

Supplies

  • Clean container(s) for your lip balm
  • Glass jar to combine ingredients (don’t use a fancy one you plan to ever use again 😉 )
  • Small sauce pot
  • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 2 Tablespoons Beeswax (I ordered pellets on Amazon, but I’ve heard you can get beeswax from local beekeepers which is a wonderful option if you know any)
  • 2 Tablespoons Coconut Oil
  • 2 Tablespoons Almond Oil
  • Essential oils for scent (I used 4 drops of Thieves essential oil)
  • Stir stick (this can get messy so keep that in mind – do not use your fine china. Chopsticks or a plastic straw work great.)

Directions

  1. Clean the glass jar you will use for your “double boiler” and the container(s) you will use to store your balm. Dry them completely (I recommend letting them air dry overnight).
  2. If you are using pellets, skip to step 3. If you are using a block of beeswax, grate it until you have enough (2 TBSP).
  3. Fill the small sauce pot half full of water and place over medium-low heat. The water should simmer slowly.
  4. Set the empty glass jar upright in the pot. The water should surround the glass jar, but no water should be coming into the glass jar.
  5. Add beeswax and coconut oil to the empty mason jar and heat slowly until both are melted.
  6. Once the beeswax and coconut oil have melted completely, remove from heat. Using your oven mitt, remove the glass jar from the hot water/pot. Do not pour out the hot water yet (you could leave it on the stove to keep it warm or just set it aside in case you need it to remelt your balm).
  7. Add olive oil and almond oil to jar and stir using your stir stick. Then add essential oils and stir again.
  8. Slowly pour mixture into your container jar(s). If the mixture begins to solidify, place the jar back into the hot water (just like you did for the double boiler) until it melts again.
  9. Leave the balm uncovered so that it can set for a few hours before use. I have 2 dogs who shed like it’s their job so I covered mine with a paper towel to avoid pet fur contamination. If you want to cover the balm while it sets, I recommend using a paper towel or lightweight cloth so that the balm can cool without condensation diluting your recipe (like it may if you use the container’s lid). 
  10. Label your balm container and enjoy!

If you are looking for lip balm that will make a cute gift, you could use the recipe above in small jars (like these tiny pots I ordered on Amazon recently. Be warned: they’re super tiny!) or you can make a sturdier balm for twist tubes.

Lip balm tubes are super easy to find online and are pretty cheap (I ordered these and they work great!).

Making the balm is exactly the same as above, but the recipe will be slightly different. I followed this recipe for Lavender Honey Chapstick from Practically Funcational and it turned out great!

chapstick

homemade chapstick in the cooling process

Before I made this balm, I heard that having a small funnel was key so I ordered this one. I used it at first, but it made the process more frustrating because when I removed it, the oil would rise up and overflow the tube. All that said, I ended up pouring [very carefully] from the glass jar straight into the tubes and it worked out just fine.

Because I was feeling fancy (and I knew I’d be gifting these), I ordered sticker labels for my chapstick tubes:

balm label

It was easy to find labels on Etsy. I ended up ordering these stickers from Chickydoddle and having half of them printed. Winnie (of Chickydoddle) was super easy to work with – she sent me proofs before printing and I received them quickly thereafter. I am really pleased with the quality and will certainly order printed labels from Chickydoddle again! I also ordered these 1-inch circle stickers – they fit perfectly on top of the tiny balm jars I ordered.

I gifted the lip balm tubes with a handmade lotion bar. I used this recipe from Wellness Mama that a friend recommended and added 10 drops each of Lavender and Ylang Ylang.

lotion bars

lotion bars while cooling

I just so happen to have 2 of these heart shaped silicone molds which made the perfect shape for the lotion bars. The heart makes a great shape for these because the indent at the top is perfect for rubbing over knuckles!

Lotion bars might be one of my favorite new discoveries. I love rubbing the bar on my hands and feet before bed. They are so easy to make and are incredibly effective at moisturizing!

If you’ve never used a lotion bar: you rub it on your dry skin like you would a bar of soap. Your skin will melt a thin layer of the lotion onto your hands, feet, whatever it touches. You just rub it on and leave it (when I describe the application like soap, everyone always asks: “Do I wash it off?” and the answer is no – let is soak in to your dry skin and enjoy!). I now prefer the bar to regular slimy lotion. Can’t get enough of it!

**Disclaimer: Links in this post are not affiliated with me in any way and I would not benefit from your purchase. I just wanted to share sources for ease of replicating the recipes. Enjoy! 🙂 **

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The Making of Baby RBG: A Halloween DIY

It started out innocent: I was picking Andy up from daycare a few weeks ago when one of her teachers said they were going to have a Halloween celebration and the babies could dress up. At first I shrugged it off. Halloween has never been a real source of excitement for me so I was thinking I’d just put her in a festive onesie and call it a day.

BUT THEN I REMEMBERED I SEW (Ha! As if I’d ever forget). And that the internet exists (thus, “quick and easy” costume sewing tutorials would be in abundance…and they were).

Inspiration

I sent some ideas to my sister-in-law (because she always entertains my craziest ideas).

Initial costumes considered: Rosie the Riveter, a ladybug, a cookie sandwich, Cookie Monster, aerobics instructor, Iris Apfel, Frida Kahlo, Tina from Bob’s Burgers – we had some serious choices to make.

Ultimately, the vote was for Ruth Bader Ginsburg!

Originally I thought we’d go with a black onesie and a fabric doily (easy-peasy), but I decided to use what I already had on hand (aka: over-complicate this seemingly innocent costume adventure) with the picture below as inspiration:

Material

I’m really proud to say that I did not buy a single thing for this costume!

  • The black fabric (crepe I think – donated from someone’s attic) for the robe was in my stash (as was the fabric used for the bias bindings).
  • My Mom gave me a stack of vintage handkerchiefs a few years ago she got from an antique shop (I used some ivory rayon challis fabric [similar] scraps from my stash for the body of the bib).
  • A friend let me borrow some snaps (for the front of the robe & the bib closure) from her stash.
  • The glasses belong to the Hubs (no prescription – they are blue light blocking glasses).
  • I made the bow a few weeks ago for a separate occasion (tutorial).

If you are looking to make your own RBG costume you might be surprised at what you already have that could work. Any type of black fabric (a bit of drape/flowiness would be preferable) can work for the robe. The costume just needs a black “backdrop” so alternatively you could use a black onesie or solid black outfit of any kind.

Rather than making a separate bib, you could just safety pin a vintage handkerchief or some lace to the front of the onesie/outfit (that was my original plan) or pin that to an existing bib (try to stick with a light color/no print so you don’t distract from the detail of the “collar.”

A toy gavel would be a great addition to the costume.

The Pattern

I was limited on time so I immediately decided that the robe would be kimono style with no set-in sleeves. To get the “pattern,” I used a jacket she had that I knew fit her currently. I laid half of the jacket on top of the black fabric along the fold.

When cutting, I added space around the jacket for seam allowance. I wanted it to have a little extra volume (like an actual judge’s robe) so I graded out a little extra in the body. I didn’t include extra space on the length of the sleeves because I didn’t want them to be too long (and, again, to more closely resemble the fitting of an actual judge’s robe).

For the back of the robe, I cut on the fold. For the front of the robe, I cut the fabric on the fold the same way, but then cut up the fold afterward to create two separate pieces. I knew I wanted the front to open so it would be easy to get on a squirmy baby.

Since finishing a Dress No. 1 recently, I’ve been on a bias finishing kick (great tutorial from IndieSew here). I knew I wanted to – at least – use bias binding to finish the neck. After cutting the pattern out and sewing the front to the back, I tried it on Andy and realized that I didn’t want to lose much length. So, rather than flipping-and-stitching the hem, I decided to bias bind the bottom too.

Sewing the Costume

The Robe

I considered French seams (because you know I love them), but ultimately decided to use the overlock stitch on my machine to eliminate the extra step.

I stitched the shoulder (& sleeve) seams together at the top and then the front-to-the-back (including the underside of the sleeves) down the sides.

This is where I stopped and tried it on Andy to see about the fit.

Then I used scrap fabric to create bias binding which I used to finish the bottom hem > the front closure (like a faux button placket) > and the neck – in that order.

Last, I attached the snaps every 2 inches.

The collar

Because of the laciest part of the handkerchief as at a corner, I wanted to make a bandanna style bib to show it off. I traced a bandanna bib Andy already had that fit well and used that as my pattern (if you do this, be sure to include an extra 1/2 inch around the edges for your seam allowance…or you can use this tutorial and pattern).

The rayon challis scraps I was using for the bib base were [obviously] super slippery. So, I used a tip I heard recently on the Love to Sew podcast and laid the fabric on top of some terry cloth (a towel would work) to keep it from slipping while I cut. That worked so well!

I constructed the bib by sewing RST, leaving a few inches unsewn at the neck, and flipping to WST. Before top-stitching, I placed the handkerchief where I wanted it on the front of the bib. I folded the top of the handkerchief by the neck since there was no neat way to get it to fold over the curved edge. I top-stitched around the bib like normal which held the handkerchief down without any extra (messy) stitching.

Here you can see where the handkerchief was folded over and how only the edges of the bib are top-stitched. This held the handkerchief on perfectly and once around Andy’s neck, it looked much more unified.

I tried the bib on Andy before attaching the snap to see if I needed to adjust the placement of the snap before attaching. Then I added the snap.

Lying flat the bib looks a little wonky, but you can see here how the handkerchief is attached.

Accessories

The glasses

Originally I had asked the Hubs to buy some baby sunglasses that we could pop the lenses out of. Our local Target only had bigger kid glasses according to him and the two he brought home weren’t quite right (though one pair would have been perfect for Iris Apfel so I’m saving them for the future!).

On that note, I remembered that he had some blue light blocking glasses that could work!

The bow

Obviously, RBG doesn’t wear bows, but I needed something to hold the glasses on so the elastic band bows I’ve been making came in quite handy.

You can see the elastic from the bow holding the glasses on here. (Also, please excuse the dinosaur feet. This was on our wear-pajamas-all-day Sunday).

More inspiration

We are certainly not the first to dress our baby up as RBG – check out these others:

I was also excited to see Alex dressed as RBG on this week’s episode of Modern Family:

I especially love the necklace!

Not gonna lie, when I see Kate McKinnon slide on the screen during SNL‘s Weekend Update, it makes my day! Her impersonation is so funny.

Rock your RBG inspiration all year long

If you love RBG and want to stay inspired beyond Halloween, I found these super cool gifts (just in time for the holidays if you have an RBG lover on your list!):

2017 Holiday Gift Guide – To Make

I’m always torn on whether to make or buy holiday gifts. I have this debate with myself annually: Will the recipient appreciate all the hours of labor I put into making this? Will I become bitter from the stress by the time I finish making this? Wouldn’t it be easier to just buy something? Will I feel as excited about gifting something I’ve purchased instead of made?

Do you ever find yourself spinning in that same internal cycle?

Well, if you’re like me and your DIY spirit animal usually wins, here are some fun handmade gift ideas!

Gifts to Sew

1. Ultimate Sleep Mask by Ohhh Lulu

I have long been admiring Ohhh Lulu’s patterns and makes on Instagram and her sleep masks are so classic!

Find the pattern here and more inspiration here.

2. Mug Rug

Mug rugs are the best for practicing your piecing and quilting skills! Also a good way to use up stray blocks. They make the perfect gift when paired with a cute mug and some cocoa mix.

You can find mug rug inspiration and a free printable gift tag in this post!

3. Drawstring Bags

I have now made 6 of these and have several more planned. The bags are intended to be knitting project bags, but I think they are so handy for anything! And they’re a great bag to wrap up a few little goodies.

{See another version I made in this post}

You can find the tutorial from Very Shannon here. These are great for assembly line sewing – cut out several to sew at a time.

4. Biased Bibs for Baby

If you’ve got babies on your list, bibs are an easy go-to! For the perfect set, make a matching diaper cover!

bib front

bib back

I made this bib for my newest niece! I followed See Kate Sew’s tutorial with a few modifications: I chose to quilt the bib rather than use fusible fleece because I had a ton of batting scraps lying around. I drew the grid onto a big square of sandwiched fabric and quilted it before cutting the pieces (to avoid it shrinking too much). I also made my own bias tape from the lining of a Lilly Pulitzer dress I chopped up.

These elephant baby bib & binkie holders would also make an adorable baby gift!

Gifts in a Jar

Check your local thrift stores for glass jars with lids to use for these fun gifts!

You could even upcycle glass jars from your pantry – run them through your dishwasher if you have one and that should loosen up the labels. Alternatively, you could soak them in hot soapy water with a few drops of lemon essential oil {see my process in action here}. If the stickiness from the labels is stubborn, add a few drops of lemon essential oil directly to the area and scrub {it’s magic!}.

1. Gluten Free Cheerio Mix

This is a great idea for the GF friend on your list. As someone with a self-inflicted dietary restriction {I’m a vegetarian}, I find it so thoughtful when someone gifts me something that shows they remembered and/or took it into consideration.

Dress it up by putting it in a mason jar and adding some festive fabric to cover the lid.

2. Chocolate Chip & Oatmeal Quickbread

This recipe looks super easy and sounds delicious! You could turn it into a basket gift by wrapping it up with a loaf pan and spatula.

3. Carpet Powder

Gifting carpet powder to someone may be weird unless they are an unapologetic neat freak like several members in my family. The carpet powder can double as an odor absorber in any room just by adding a ventilated lid or leaving the lid off.

Find the tutorial here.

4. Shaving Cream

Anyone else find it near impossible to find DIY gifts for guys?! Shaving Cream or Beard Oil are my go-to’s. For the perfect gift, pair them with a new toiletry bag!

Find the tutorial for the shaving cream and beard oil here. For more ideas, you can find 7 DIY Beard Oil recipes in this guide from WiseBeards!

5. Infused Olive Oil

Not only do these look incredibly chic, but they look super easy to make! For the perfect basket, pair them with a loaf of fresh baked bread (if you’re not a baker, find your local bakery and support them!).

Find the tutorial here.

Don’t forget to whip up a handmade holiday card to go with your gift! You could even make your own envelopes to go with the cards – use any large paper scraps you have lying around (paper grocery bags work great!).

For more DIY gift ideas, check out this post!

DIY Carpet Powder

Last year at Crafty Feast, I picked up the most amazing handmade carpet powder. It was lavender scented and even had pieces of dried lavender bud mixed in. It came in a 16 ounce jar which [unfortunately] only lasted me one application.

I may have ignored the “sprinkle lightly” instructions… {I have 3 dogs!}

Being frugal [and stocked with essential oils] I was determined to make my own.

I was quite surprised at how simple it was to make. Let me follow that with: I am not a professional carpet-powder-connoisseur. I am just a frugal gal who was in desperate need of help alleviating the affects of three dogs on rugs – and I think I found a pretty good solution!

carpet-powder

What you need

  • Glass jars with lids
  • Baking soda (1 pound will fill a 16-ounce jar)
  • Essential Oils (my favorite odor-busting combination is Young Living’s Thieves [10 drops] + Purification [20 drops])
  • Mixer or whisk 
  • Mixing bowl

To start, I gathered two 16-ounce jars. After realizing how easy this was to make, I would’ve made more if I had more jars available!

One of my jars was leftover from the carpet freshener I purchased at Crafty Feast. The other jar was a salsa jar that I cleaned and thoroughly air-dried. I found that running the jar through my dishwasher loosened the label enough for me to peel off, but if you do not have a dishwasher, you could soak the jar in hot, soapy water and use some lemon essential oil to remove it.jars

The purchased powder came with a super cute lid for sprinkling, but I have seen some at Hobby Lobby and also here on Amazon. Alternately, you could drill holes into the lid you have or just plan to sprinkle with the lid off.

lids

One two-pound box of baking soda will fill two 16-ounce jars. Any brand of baking soda is fine!

baking-soda

Gather your supplies. While I used my electric mixer, you could easily mix this with a whisk. The substance is light so you don’t need much power.

Some essential oils (mostly citrus-based) can break down plastic so I avoid using plastic kitchenware when mixing recipes with essential oils just in case. I found this metal mixing bowl at Target, but a glass bowl would also be fine.

supplies

You can either measure out two cups of baking soda or pour the baking soda into your jar until it fills the top then dump into your mixing bowl. The latter is probably best – I  found that when I measured out exactly two cups I ended up with a little spilling over my jar.

powder

The best recipe I have found incorporates 10 drops of Thieves Essential Oil and 20 drops of Purification Essential Oil. These are definitely two of my favorite, most used oils (second to lavender!). The fragrance of the Thieves oil reminds me of Christmas so the scent is really comforting. The Purification oil is great for cleansing the air and alleviating odors (also makes a great spray for your car).

Note: I use Young Living essential oils. I have a membership with them and have been very pleased with the quality. I have not tried this recipe with other brands of EO’s, but use whatever suits you best!

pet-oils

The Thieves + Purification combination is a heavy hitter for odors. It is a great combo if you have pets. Another combination I tried for a fresher scent was Grapefruit and Citrus Fresh (Orange could be a good substitute) – 7-8 drops of each oil.

citrus-oils

Whatever combination you choose, sprinkle the drops directly onto the baking soda dumped into your mixing bowl. Try to sprinkle them evenly – I found that the oils clump a bit in the baking soda so spreading them around is best.

oils-in-powder

Now mix it up! Again, you really don’t need much power since this is a light mixture. If you are using an electric mixer, use the lowest speed. You could also use a whisk.

If you do not have a funnel in your kitchen (I did not), grab a clean piece of paper and twist for a make-shift funnel. Use the funnel to help pour the mixture into your jar. This can still get quite messy so placing a tea towel under your jar might be a good idea 😉

funnel

You  will want to let your mixture sit for at least 30 minutes for the oils to mingle with the baking soda. I let mine sit for a few days before use. Since these are so easy to make, it’s worth whipping up several at a time so they are ready for use when you need them. This would also make a great housewarming gift.

Be sure to label your jars – particularly if you are making multiple scent combinations so you will know which to grab depending on your needs. You can use washi tape across the top of the jar or on the side of your jar if you don’t have a label-maker (that’s on my wish list!). Alternately, you could use these chalkboard mason jar lid labels.

citrus-powder

I’m a heavy sprinkler so one jar typically lasts me one area rug. Depending on the odor you’re dealing with, you could very likely stretch it further. Since I know how easy it is to whip up, I’m less concerned with stretching it 😉

Once you sprinkle on your carpet, let it sit for at least 30 minutes. I usually let it sit for a few hours or even overnight before vacuuming up.

pet-powder

And you’re done! Can you believe how easy that was?!

Turn this recipe into a room air freshener/odor absorber by cutting in half for an 8-ounce jar (like these) or quartering for a 4-ounce jar (like these). Just leave the lid off or add one of these pretty lids.

Flying Geese Pin Cushion

I’m really loving paper piecing! If you haven’t tried it out yet, you totally should. It’s much easier than you think (I was overthinking it until our quilt guild president de-mystified the process during a demo at a recent meeting. Here’s a tutorial with some great pictures).

After playing around with paper piecing with the basic diamond template Amber shared with us at the meeting, I started searching the internet for more templates to play with.

It didn’t take long to find a flying geese pattern that I loved! I followed these instructions and shrunk the pattern by 33% when I printed. It’s the perfect size for a pin cushion which is great because this month our quilt guild hosted a pin cushion swap!

pin cushion 2

My partner loves batik prints so it was a chance for me to work with a fabric that I don’t normally use. I found some fat quarters at JoAnn’s and used green for the geese and purple for the background pieces. I used a fun blue print for the bottom of the cushion.

I used some scrap batting to line against the goose block. Rather than quilt the geese (I really couldn’t figure out how to do that without ruining the design), I added a border and then stitched around the border with some fun blue thread I picked up at an estate sale.

I stitched the batting to the flying geese block then set it right-sides-facing on top of the bottom piece and then squared them up (cutting the edges) so they were the same size. Then I stitched all around the sandwich – leaving a few inches open at the bottom for flipping.

pin cushion 6

the underside of the pretty blue stitches against the batting

Then I clipped the corners so they would be pointy when flipped (watch out for your stitch line so you don’t accidentally cut into it!).

pin cushion 7

I flipped the cushion so that right sides were now facing out and hand stitched the closing using a blind stitch {here is a tutorial with great pictures}.

pin cushion 5

Some people hate sewing by hand, but I love the control it gives you. I certainly wouldn’t want to do an entire quilt by hand {I absolutely do not have that kind of patience}, but I will say that taking the time to blind stitch is totally worth it! It’s great for closing an infinity scarf or the interior of a bag and leads to a much cleaner finish.

pin cushion 4

I happen to have a giant bag of plain ol’ stuffing {I think I had visions of making throw pillows or maybe some fun softies/stuffed animals…} so I used that to fill the cushion. Lately I’ve noticed that my pins seem to be getting dull. Next time I may try stuffing a pin cushion with steel wool to keep my pins sharp {idea here}.

pin cushion 1

After some advice from my quilt guild buddies at our last sew-in, I pressed my seams to the side rather than open when I pieced the four little goose blocks together to make the full circle of geese. This really helped seal the center of the block and align the pieces perfectly {I’m quite proud of that center intersection!}. Here’s a good run-down of pressing your seams open vs. pressing them to the side if you’re interested 😉

pin cushion 2

I hope my partner likes her new pin cushion! 🙂

{PS: If you’re anywhere near Columbia, SC and enjoy sewing of any sort-and-kind, you should check out the Palmetto Modern Quilt Guild! You can follow the page on Facebook to see when the next meeting will be. The guild hosts monthly sew-ins which are super fun – I love being able to pick the brains of fellow [far more experienced] sewists!}

DIY Fabric Scrap Holiday Card

Last week I received a donation request from one of my favorite local charities. I had been meaning to send a donation, but [as it always does] life got in the way.

With the donation request, they included a return envelope, but I felt odd sending the check alone. So, with the paper and fabric scraps I had on hand, I whipped up this super easy holiday card to accompany the check.

Since it was so easy, I figured I’d share with you how I did it!

holiday card

Supplies

  • Blank cardstock (I used white because it’s what I had on hand, but any light color would work)
  • Fabric scraps (Use what you have on hand – if you don’t have fabric, you could use scrapbook paper or even magazine clippings)
  • Stamps – including alphabetical stamps
  • Ink pad
  • Glue 
  • Thread
  • Sewing Machine 

Directions

1. Cut your fabric scraps [or paper] into tiny triangles to act as “flags” in your design.

2. Lay the “flags” side-by-side (corner-to-corner) with a slight curve downward to form the bunting. If it would help, you could lightly draw a curved line with pencil to follow.

3. Use a little dab of glue to hold the “flags” in place.

4. Next [optional], if you have any festive stamps (like my reindeer) or stickers, stamp/stick one in an area where you have extra white space (like the lower corner).

holiday card 1

5. Use your alphabetical stamps to spell out “Happy Holidays” under the bunting. If you don’t have alphabetical stamps, you could write it in calligraphy, bubble letters with markers or even cut letters from construction paper and glue them down.

holiday card 2

6. Go fix yourself a cup of coffee or tea {aka: give the ink a minute or two to fully dry before you start stitching to avoid smudging}

7. Set your sewing machine to a straight stitch and adjust the length to the longest it will go.

8. Once your ink has dried, begin stitching from the left side of the card and follow the curved line to sew across the top of all of the “flags.” Back-stitch at each end and trim excess thread.

Voila! You now have a super-festive handmade card to send!

holiday card 3

There are tons of ways you can vary this design, but this is just an idea to get you started. I’d love to see what you make – tag me on Instagram: @jordanslicemet.

Happy holidays!

Handmade Holiday Gift Ideas

Since it is already the beginning of December {how did that happen?!}, I wanted to share a few tried-and-true handmade gift ideas in hopes they’ll inspire you to DIY some gifts on your holiday list!

gift ideas

Below are links to either my version of the project [if I blogged about it] or a direct link to a tutorial I followed [if I didn’t blog about my version].

For everyone:

  • Mug RugThese are great for anyone! You can pair it with a vintage teacup and a few bags of your favorite tea. {Find a bundle of mug rug gift ideas and a free gift tag printable in this post}

mug rug

  • Stationary Set No better time to upcycle the year’s calendar than now – find my tutorial here. Don’t have a calendar to upcycle? No problem! You can use a magazine or vintage maps – like I did here.

envelopes

  • Quick & Easy Big Block Quilt – use the method I used for my Beach Blanket to save loads of time.

blanket

tree ornaments

Quilted Christmas Tree ornaments made by yours truly using the tutorial linked above.

  • Throw PillowsYou can find my tutorial for very basic pillows here (below: right). You can also read about the sweater pillow covers (below: left) I made here.

pillows

For more pillow ideas, check out my Pillow Ideas Pinterest Board!

For gals:

envelope clutch

  • No-Sew Blanket Scarf – confession: I haven’t tried this yet, but the tutorial from the OK Southerner (PS: Love her blog!) is pretty straight forward. This is a DIY gift anyone could make!
blanket scarf

{Images borrowed from the OK Southerner}

  • Addie K’s Canny Tunic – this pattern is very forgiving. Even if you don’t know the exact size of the gal you’re making it for, you can guess and it’ll likely still fit her. Plus, everyone needs a tunic like this for the holidays [hello desserts! And chocolate! And warm snuggles instead of running!].
{Photo credit: Addie Martindale}

{Photo credit: Addie Martindale}

  • Lace Locket Necklaceso stinkin’ easy! Elevate yourself to “Best Gift Giver” status if you can snag some lace from the recipient’s wedding dress. 

lace necklace1

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey – give the gift of a laugh-out-loud book sprinkled with moments of pure empowerment. {Spoiler: this is not a DIY…because sometimes you just gotta BUY the gift!}

bossypants For guys:

DIY

For little tots:

  • Cloth Baby Shoes – they’re easier to make than you think! Bonus: Make them from an old pair of Dad/Grandpa’s shorts!

shoes 3

For more ideas: Check out last year’s Handmade Holiday Blog Hop Recap (follow the links to the five blogger’s posts all full of ideas) or browse my Pinterest Boards where I’ve been frivolously pinning ideas I’ll never get to.

What are your favorite handmade holiday gifts? I’d love to hear about your favorites – leave a comment below!